Marketing Job Salaries

The average annual salary for a marketing job is $62,000, according to SimplyHired.com. This goes up in places like New York and California, but in areas with lower costs of living, the average salary for marketing jobs goes down significantly. According to AllBusinessSchools.com, the average marketing salary in areas with a lower cost of living is closer to $30,000.

According to Salary.com, a marketing assistant in 2010 made from $29,818 to $46,693. A marketing specialist earned between $44,000 and $65,000. A media coordinator made, on average, $32,639, but these are entry-level figures that could improve as the new hire gains experience and the economy turns around. Also, benefits typically are part of the compensation package for a marketing job, including paid time off, a pension, healthcare benefits, disability, 401K and bonuses. A marketing assistant with a base salary of $37,646 is likely to rake in an additional $18,309 in benefits, according to Salary.com.

Maybe that level of compensation won't get you the penthouse suite overlooking Central Park, but think of it as getting your foot in the door. Marketing professionals are regularly promoted into the ranks of management, and now you're looking at something in the range of $150,000 annually. The median salary for marketing managers is $110,030.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the top-paying industries for marketing jobs are as follows: financial investment institutions, securities and commodities exchanges, motion picture and video enterprises, oil and gas extraction companies, and pipeline transportation of natural gas. When you think about the headlines in the newspapers, these are probably the concerns most in need of public relations repair work.

The job outlook for advertising, marketing, promotions, public relations, and sales managers is about average in comparison with other occupations, a projected 13 percent growth through 2018. The BLS projects that most marketing job openings will occur due to workers leaving or retiring from the positions. Competition is keen for these slots and managers from other areas of the company are likely to covet the opportunity. College graduates with a high level of creativity, coupled with sharp communication and computer skills, will likely gain that inside track.

Last Updated: 05/21/2014